14 thoughts on “The Snail Moved”

  1. Just remember, wooden instruments need to be played or they die. No, really, it’s not good for them to be static forever. Even if it’s just to take one down every month and mess with it for an hour or so.

    Plus playing with Nathan’s guitars brings him back, in a manner of speaking.

    It’s beautiful and I know it will only get better. Is he mowing now, in celebration?

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  2. Just remember, wooden instruments need to be played or they die.

    Nathan’s guitars have been hanging like that for ten years (in my office). A friend comes to visit every now and then and when he does, he checks them out, changes the strings, etc. This last time, it had been a couple of years since his last visit and the Taylor (the middle guitar) had ONE string slightly out of tune. That was all. He didn’t even change the strings. We were all amazed.

    We’ve gotten a replacement bridge but haven’t put it on there yet. The existing bridge is so worn that Nathan used to shove a folded piece of paper under it. A new bridge cost a whopping $6. Sigh. Why didn’t he fix it? LOL

    It’s really nice to hear the Taylor played. That was Nate’s primary guitar and it has a very distinctive sound (evident in the album called “LIVE”). There is a worn place where his hand rested that is nearly all the way through the wood.

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  3. BTW, that is a Gibson on the left, not his first guitar but an older one. It’s covered in signatures (Honey Boy Edwards, Allison Krause, etc) which is why he wouldn’t get rid of it). The Taylor is in the middle. And the electric is a Fender.

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  4. Wow beautiful! Al’s work really looks like a door to me, which is very cool as an homage, as I look into Nate’s world through this door and see the man and his music.
    Thanks for sharing this Sally. Very moving.

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  5. Nathan’s guitars have been hanging like that for ten years (in my office). A friend comes to visit every now and then and when he does, he checks them out, changes the strings, etc. This last time, it had been a couple of years since his last visit and the Taylor (the middle guitar) had ONE string slightly out of tune. That was all. He didn’t even change the strings. We were all amazed.

    I don’t doubt it, but there is something about playing them that is necessary for their “health”. At least in the circles in which I’ve hung out. Luthiers, cellists, violinists, etc. They’re a breed unto themselves.

    This is old, but it illustrates what I’m trying to say. Play them. It’s good for them. No, I haven’t looked for anything more recent. I’m glad your friend checks them out and they’re in good shape.

    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/02/27/science/when-violinists-play-their-violins-improve.html

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  6. Dave & Sally,
    Thank you both for sharing ” Nathan’s Memorial Wall ” with all of us. You did not have to do that, and that is what makes it even all that much more special to me….your gift of him, and who is was, opening up and sharing his music with all of us and to the world.
    Wow, what a wonderful gift !!!! 🙂
    I did not know your son Nathan, but have enjoyed his music he left behind and shared by you. He was a very, very talented young artist. Someone I will always remember…not just for his music, but for his loving Mother and Father….who honored him in such loving ways.
    The WALL is beautiful….something I will never forget seeing.
    Al did such an amazing job bringing Nathan’s shadow to life.
    Beautiful, just Beautiful !!!

    Thank You, for sharing your son with all of us.

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