25 thoughts on “Ten Month Mamas”

  1. What do they mean when they say “44+2” and such? Surely, that can’t mean 44 weeks and 2 days?
    They named their daughter Earthside…..

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  2. Surely, that can’t mean 44 weeks and 2 days?

    Yep, it does.

    She didn’t mean that they named the baby that. It’s a euphemism for being born. It’s stupid. The baby was already on earth the whole time.

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  3. From the article:

    “….so immature that they think defiance marks them as authentic.

    This baby did not have to die. She was killed by her mother’s choices and the group of like minded fools who supported her.”

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  4. Somehow expectant mothers who demand home birth in defiance of medical advice remind me of the way that bridezillas will demand absurd compliance to the swollen ideal of their special day. Indeed, it is all about them, and the baby’s welfare seems to completely secondary to the expectant mother’s ideals. Heck, sometimes as in the case of Nicole Naugler, their own health is secondary to the ridiculous ideal.

    Birth is described as something beautiful. Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t. But the nuts and bolts of it have their considerable dangers and I am sure that those who clean up the after effects of the birth may disagree with the beauty of it all. I am a fan of the Big Bang Theory and when Sheldon had to go home to assist in his sister’s home birth, Sheldon was appropriately derisive. If I remember correctly he described it as his sister turning the bedroom floor into an amniotic slip and slide. Why the heck would you want that mess in your house? Yeah, pioneers had to because there was no other choice. But then most people don’t choose to live in a three sided lean-to over the winter and act surprised when CPS takes their kids from it.

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  5. I remember a blessed little walking disaster letting us know that 44 weeks was totally normal.
    Who thinks that the doctor knows more than the keeper of the shed and the washer of dog butts?

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  6. I saw that post (by Dr. Amy) this morning. I couldn’t help but think it was written for Nicole. The level of abject stupidity in those Facebook groups, forums and the internet in general astounds me.

    Not getting prenatal care is beyond stupid. Unassisted home birth is downright frighteningly stupid.

    Mrs. “I know my body”, “my babies like to hang out until 44 weeks” and “There isn’t any prenatal care I can’t do myself” has exponentially beaten the odds, until she didn’t. Please retire the clown car, also known as your uterus.

    Mr. “I know how to read a sonogram” but “can’t remember what DIC stands for” (diseminated intravascular coagulation, maybe you were sleeping, or stoned the day YouTube University covered that) needs a rusty fork to his nuts. Really, tell us profat, how do you “read” a sonogram?

    Fucking idiots.

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  7. I read the article and it was terrifying. What’s that disparaging term for blindly following the group instead of using critical thinking? Oh … “sheeple.” Poor baby was “you go, girl” to death.

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  8. “She didn’t mean that they named the baby that. It’s a euphemism for being born.”
    I read it quick, therefore I read that part wrong. ugh, I’m an idiot and it’s very Monday.

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  9. My 1st baby I know the exact day I got pregnant. It was 12/31/74. My husband was on leave for that one night. He was in the Navy. Flew up from San Diego that day and went back on 1/1/75. I was 18 years old. About the end of February I thought I had the stomach flu. It was going on for weeks. My girl friend asked me towards the end of February if maybe I was pregnant. I looked at her in complete shock, thought back and realized I hadn’t had a period since December! Hadn’t enter my mind. I quickly called Oak Knoll (naval hospital) for a appointment. Back in the day it took weeks to get in to see a doctor. I got in around March 15th. They took blood and had me pee in a cup and sent me on my way saying they would call me in a MONTH to let me know if I was pregnant. (They used to do the rabbit test and it took a while). In April I found out I was indeed pregnant and was set up for all my doctors visits. My due date was early Sept or late August. By August they had me coming in every week for check ups, everything was fine, that’s just how they did it. When my due date came and went they weren’t concerned. I gave birth on Oct 5th. He weighed 8 lbs 7 oz. I had a difficult delivery as he was transverse, but lucky I didn’t have to have a c section. Back then a c section meant no more babies, at least it did at a military hospital. The bikini cut didn’t start being widely used until the next year. My second baby was also 10 months, and again I followed all doctors orders (we were no longer military in 79). He was 9 lbs 10 ozs and healthy. It was my easiest delivery. My next baby was a nine month baby and my smallest at seven lbs. He had the cord wrapped around him and the doctor had seen it on my visit to him and ordered me to the hospital. Still had him vaginally and he was ok. I followed doctors orders in all my pregnancies. I guess I figured they were smarter than me.

    I would never do what nag does. I’m either not that brave or not that stupid. Take your pick.

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  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3719843/

    RESULTS

    The risk of stillbirth at term increases with gestational age from 2.1 per 10,000 ongoing pregnancies at 37 weeks of gestation up to 10.8 per 10,000 ongoing pregnancies at 42 weeks of gestation. At 38 weeks of gestation, the risk of expectant management carries a similar risk of death as delivery, but at each later gestational age, the mortality risk of expectant management is higher than the risk of delivery (39 weeks of gestation: 12.9 compared with 8.8 per 10,000; 40 weeks of gestation: 14.9 compared with 9.5 per 10,000; 41 weeks of gestation: 17.6 compared with 10.8 per 10,000).

    CONCLUSION

    Infant mortality rates at 39, 40, and 41 weeks of gestation are lower than the overall mortality risk of expectant management for 1 week.

    Notice what isn’t included? Weeks 42 – 44 gestation.

    http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/stillbirth.aspx#

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  11. It is arrogance to think the average person knows more about pregnancy and child birth than someone who has specifically trained for this field, and spent years in medical school and internships learning his or her stuff. To play Russian roulette with your unborn child’s life is just appalling to me. All for bragging rights about having a home birth. Geez! I know having a home birth is very important to some women (not me – no way, give me a hospital birth any day of the week); but at some point, shouldn’t the needs of your unborn child come before your desire to give birth at home?

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  12. In fairness to JN it is pretty obvious on ultrasound when a full term baby has a heartbeat. If you have seen it even once it’s pretty unforgettable; I’ve seen it innumerable times now. Earlier ultrasounds aren’t real easy to distinguish but later ones are very obvious. A head looks like a head, ribs look like ribs, and it’s very clear when you don’t see the flickering in the chest, or any movement whatsoever that the baby is dead. Babies always move a little on ultrasound.

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  13. I think of it this way…

    Babies who are still born really don’t suffer. They don’t go on to be raised by morons. They don’t live to continue their parent’s dangerous cycle of stupidity. They don’t contaminate the gene pool with more stupid.

    As truly tragic as a term stillbirth is… with this degree of stupid at the helm, it might, in fact, be more tragic if the child lived.

    O. witnessed Nicole’s near death. I’m guessing her post traumatic stress from this event will inform her future decisions about childbirth. I’m guessing A. was pretty shaken as well, since she was present for the last hemorrhage that Nic and Joe called the EMT’s to help with before deciding they didn’t need them after all . And while there are a whole troupe of Naugler boys who could be contaminated by this misinformation, it’s pretty likely the girls they partner up with with have a little common sense like Faith did.

    Chances are good that this particular stupid practice will end with Nic.

    If one truly good thing comes of poor little W’s death…perhaps it will be saving his older sister’s lives someday with his sacrifice. I’m sure it made a deeply affecting impression.

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  14. And yet those are the same momma’s who boast that they know their bodies and when to seek medical care if needed during L&D. Well, you obviously DO NOT know your body that well. There is a reason DR’s induce after a set amount of time once due date has come and gone, safety of mom and baby. As far as the mom losing her kid and saying “it was a well informed decision”, that pisses me off. A mom who chooses a hospital birth is also able to make well informed decision regarding their labor and delivery. I chose to give birth in a hospital, surrounded by medical professionals that could help in any situation. I was fully aware of everything going on. And I am convinced that had the medical staff not been on top of things, and wheeled me back for an emergency c-section, my son may have died. (Long story short, I labored for 14 hours, never dilated more than like 6, and my son would not drop further in the birth canal; come to find out, his cord was in a knot which was why he wouldn’t drop further and they had to resuscitate him when they took him out.) Yes, there was a day and age where women gave birth at home with little to no medical staff, but in those days, babies died for many of the same reasons these women these days are being hard headed and stupid about. >_<

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  15. @M Rigatoni

    I’d like to know how many of these women are pro-lifers (totally their choice to feel it’s wrong to abort/kill a baby for whatever reason). But aren’t they in a way hypocritical for playing Russian roulette with their 10 month pregnancies?

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  16. My first, born in ’84, was 2 weeks late. I had prenatal care throughout and was on my way in for a stress test when contractions started. I labored at home overnight, then went back 24 hours after the test. I labored, with pitocin,throughout the day until I was put under and my son was delivered by forceps. I was exhausted and could no longer help. I put my trust in the doctor and my son was born healthy and safe.

    Why do these women do what they do? It seems like a dare or a personal challenge to see who can carry the longest, a badge of honor. They always know what’s best for them while seeming so callous about the wellbeing of the baby. It’s selfish, it’s ignorant, and it’s absolutely horrifying.

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  17. Death from nuchal cords (wrapped around the baby’s neck) and true knots aren’t actually very common. There is this stuff called Wharton’s jelly that prevents cord compression from a knot, and babies don’t breathe until after they leave the birth canal anyway. The problem is the length of the cord moreso than the knot or the wrapping of it around the neck. A short cord is a problem no matter what. Combine a short cord with a knot and it can override that jelly and cause compression, or make it impossible for the baby to safely descend. You could actually have a cord that is too short for delivery without any wrapping or knots whatsoever. I’ve had two babies with nuchal cords and true knots; first single wrap and single knot, second two wraps (like a bandolier) and two true knots. In both cases the cord was long enough for the baby to descend. Was finding out they had knots and nuchal cords scary? Absolutely, I am glad I had doctors present for delivery. Yet neither of those deliveries were adversely effected by the cord. The second son had a partial placental abruption, but that was related to hyperstimulation of my uterus during the induction, not the nuchal cords and knots. His cord was long enough to lay him on my chest after delivery without cutting the cord. They even delayed cord clamping per my wishes.

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  18. To put a finer point on it; I asked if I would have had a c-section if they detected the nuchal cords and knots before delivery and was told unequivocally “no”. They would have been watching for signs of distress much like any other delivery.

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  19. This makes me sick and so angry at Nicole I could scream! I would hope that she really doesn’t believe a curse killed her baby. Nicole killed her child. No one else. And as they don’t accept blame for any of their wrong doing, if they do get pregnant again, I can see Nicole doing the same damn thing for the sole purpose of thumbing her nose at her critics.

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  20. She is not that stupid to think a curse killed her kid, but the thing is, it plays good with her dumber then shit followers. It moves the goal posts away from her to viv. She knows fucking well she killed her kid when she says to the doctors, (was there something she could have done differently). Of course there was, everyone told you ad nasuem to see a doctor but you had it in your mind you knew your body, well suprise, you had no idea what you knew, What a fucking idiot

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  21. She knows there was no fucking curse, but her humpers dont, shift the goal post NN, your fucking good at that

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  22. Nicole and Joe appear to be somewhat surprised, and pleased by the care they received at the hospital. It makes me wonder if somewhere, way in the past when Jacob was born, Nicole had a bad experience at the delivery, or while she was in hospital. I only say this because they seem genuinely surprised that the L&D nurses and staff were compassionate, caring and generally wonderful. I’ve only had two sons, but in my experience, L&D nurses and midwives are always caring and compassionate. They are absolutely marvellous people, who go out of their way to help women have a healthy child in the best way possible. Nicole even noted they let her labour on all fours – I guess they really don’t know much at all about hospital care, do they? I wonder whether, if they had visited Hardin Memorial’s L&D ward before the birth, she may have changed her mind about labouring in that shed…probably not, because she always knows better 🙁

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  23. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3991404/

    “Complications of postterm pregnancies
    Postterm pregnancies are associated with increased fetal and neonatal motality and morbidity as well as maternal morbidity. These risks are greater than it was originally thought. Risks have been underestimated in the past for two reasons. First, earlier studies on postterm pregnancy were published before the routine use of ultrasound for pregnancy dating. As a result many pregnancies included in the studies were not actually postterm. The second reason rests within the definition of stillbirth itself. Stillbirth rates were traditionally calculated using pregnancies delivered at a given gestational age rather than ongoing (undelivered) pregnancies. This would lower the stillbirth rates in postterm pregnancies as once the fetus is delivered it is no longer at risk of intra-uterine fetal death (IUFD). The appropriate denominator is therefore not all deliveries at a given gestational age but ongoing (undelivered) pregnancies (Rand et al., 2000; Smith, 2001; Caughey et al., 2003).

    One retrospective study of over 170,000 singleton births, using the appropriate denominator demonstrated a 6-fold increase in stillbirth rates in postterm pregnancies from 0.35 to 2.12 per 1000 ongoing pregnancies (Hilder et al., 1998).”

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  24. Nicole and Joe appear to be somewhat surprised, and pleased by the care they received at the hospital.

    I think they were pleased because they had not just a nurse with them, but a whole fucking team of medical personnel trying to save Nicole’s worthless hide. She was the Queen of the ICU. She likes being the center of attention. Lots of attention. Positive, negative – she doesn’t care. Send money!

    I bet she didn’t have nearly as many people attending to her every want and need with her first baby and eventually she had sufficient numbers in the audience to justify giving birth at home. Worked great (for her) until it didn’t.

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