Gobsmacked

Ignorance is the curse of God; knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.—William Shakespeare

I am sort of astonished that this has become an issue. While I was aware that Nicole isn’t exactly what anyone would consider an educated person, I had no idea her condition was this deplorable.

Referring to the previous post, Nicole had this to say.

smart

The Geoffrey character (who may or may not be using a real identity) got it right in that “he” seems to know the meaning of the word, but it’s quite clear that Nicole did not.  The expression “smart a bit” flew right over her head.

Here’s the offending quote:

It has to smart a bit to be on a list like this, not once, but five times. . .

Here, Nicole.

smart definition

And then she adds this.

wont

Regarding this one it is obvious that she thinks I made some sort of error and was using the contraction “won’t.” She had no idea what the word “wont” means, or even that such a word exists.

wont definition

 

sic

“Geoffrey” and Nicole both need to look shit up before making declarations.  I used “sic” in that quote to make it clear that Nicole had actually used the phrase “political rants.” The usage is awkward in my opinion.  I was just clarifying that I had copied her words exactly.

Of course, after a few commenters on her page corrected her erroneous (for Nicole: mistaken) assumptions, she insisted that she really knew what those words meant all along, but that I was just being presumptuous (for Nicole: trying to sound smart).

ridiculous

No, Nicole.  I am using words to communicate. I am going to use a lot more of them. This is how I write. Really, it is.  It’s also how I talk.

And no, you weren’t “familiar with them.”  Nice try, though.

But you know, this brings up the subject of language and grammar in general. I know that I have a larger working vocabulary than many people do. I do not typically go around correcting other people in their use of language, or being condescending if they use words incorrectly, or misspell something on the Internet.  For pity’s sake, a lot of us are typing on tiny phone screens.

I will tell you why I have a decent-sized working vocabulary.

I read.

I read a lot.

And not romance fiction.  I read everything you can imagine.  You know those lists of books you see every now and then, of the “100 books you should read” or  “50 classics that should be on your bookshelf”?  I have pretty much read them all.  When you read a lot, you pick up words. It’s impossible not to do that.

And when a person has no idea that “smart” is a verb, or that the word “wont” even exists at all, I know something about that person.  She doesn’t read much, if at all. (Memes and posts on Facebook, and dumbed-down internet articles do not count.  I’m talking about literature, science, history. Actual books.)

She is this deficient herself while simultaneously proclaiming that “homeschooling is easy.”

homeschooling hard

One would think that if you tackle a job and are woefully ill-equipped to accomplish the task, you would be more or less aware that you are making a muddled mess out of it, but I suppose in this case, that’s not true.

I am doing this sort of grammar police thing with Nicole for only one reason. You can read all about it here.

And here’s a handy link just for Nicole.  I would suggest she bookmark it and consult it often.

shakespeare

 

 

 

 

19 thoughts on “Gobsmacked”

  1. I hope she looks up the meaning of “owned”.

    Well written and quite funny in a “Here’s your ass honey, stop showing it to everybody” sorta way.

  2. For two of those precious kiddos, it would be great if this could be a really special day with lots of loving, focused attention from mom. But I suppose she’ll choose to spend her free time on the internet instead.

    I hope she can practice a little self-control, put away her phone, try to manage her emotions and just step away from the internet, at least for today.

  3. Nicole asks for everything negative that she gets. I have never commented on the BLH or her personal Facebook page. I don’t trust either one of them. I would love to tell her to shut up. Stop posting anything that does not have to do with her so-called homestead. The time she takes each day posting meme’s, typing out snarky responses to Facebook comments, and searching the internet to find fodder that backs up her world views takes a tremendous amount of energy. Nicole feels like she is constantly being persecuted for her views. But she puts it out there. What would happen if Nicole just shut up? She wouldn’t be in the little limelight she so relishes. She thrives on being angry, mad at the world, and The Man. And no matter how much we root for those poor kids….I have little hope for any of them. They are being raised to be just as angry and view the world as Nicole and Joe do.

  4. How can you teach if you don’t know? How can you make decisions based on “the proper information” when you don’t even know what the ‘proper’ information is because your own reading comprehension is so poor?

    Poor children are being handicapped from day 1 because Mom doesn’t know and Mom *and* Dad are burning up the internet on FB?

  5. Okay, I really can’t tell with her if she’s baiting or not so much of the time. “Viola”? Really? She had to have done that on purpose.

  6. Nicole and Joe are hollow. They won’t or can’t possibly figure out how to fill up the empty spaces within themselves, by their own efforts. So spending a great deal of time on the internet generating responses (negative or positive attention is still ATTENTION) makes them feel as though they’re of particular importance.

    Nations and important people have enemies. The rest of us have annoying in-laws, family members, co-workers, neighbours, etc. We’re just not so stuck on ourselves that we believe we rate having enemies. Not so for Joe and Nicole. They have “haters” (enemies) and they must spend time getting attention from them rather than actually doing anything to better their circumstances. You know, if you have to deal with your “enemies” then of course there is no time or reason to take care of your real responsibilities. As is their wont, they can delegate them to their subordinates (their children). Or they wind up some of their readers who will jump to their defense at the slightest whiff of criticism. I don’t know what their Facebook friends think the Naugler’s will give them in exchange for their efforts. A brace of rabbits?

  7. Sad Spiral, I too think she is all too often simply baiting. It fits with her need for constant attention when one alienates oneself from face to face interactions within a community, and her history of constantly picking fights and escalating every situation possible. A prime example is the traffic stop video. I will never forget the officer’s composure and smiling demeanor after trying to understand the Mr.’s strange rants. They both need to find healthier outlet to burn off their constant aggression. I bet at least one has hypertension.

  8. As is their wont, they can delegate them to their subordinates (their children).

    LOL I see what you did there. Using those big words so you’ll look smart. 🙂

  9. https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpt1/v/t1.0-9/12494801_1543243809327399_4765390096157062678_n.jpg?oh=ba3d4dddf3f5df607d1705230358397c&oe=5708ABF1

    In response to the link above (if it works), I would argue that Nicole is subject to criticism, not critiquing. After all, by her own admission she isn’t writing an essay or article.

    “The terms critic, criticize, criticism have always had a double sense in English. The base meaning is “pass judgment on”, but in popular use the words have usually meant “pass a negative judgment on”, while in academic and literary use they have tended in the opposite direction, signifying close and dispassionate analysis which may or may not issue in a formal judgment.

    The French version critique was adopted into English primarily as a noun, meaning an instance of criticism, a critical essay or notice; in many cases there is no evident distinction between critic(k) and critique in this sense until the 19th century. Around 1960 academics began using critique in both nominal and verbal senses more and more frequently—at a guess, as a desperate effort to drive into thick undergraduate heads the fact that the critical endeavour in literature, art, history and philosophy is not simply a matter of expressing negative opinions.”

  10. I agree Sad Spiral, it is hard to tell if she’s baiting all the time, or maybe just some of the time. And who satiates the hook more, the minions or the “trolls”. Oh, and brilliant Dame Judi Dench quote/meme! Well spoken, Michelle. What would happen if Nicole just shut up?….imo, would quite possibly be a demonstration of humility and humbleness.

  11. I thought if she saw another example of the word being used properly it would help her remember the difference between won’t and wont. Both are correctly pronounced with the long o sound, but it’s also correct in the US to use the short o pronunciation.

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