Enclosed

howdoisee

Nicole, who never reads this blog, read this blog.  She immediately pounced on this little gem and screen shot it.  Here’s the screen shot blown up so you can read it. It comes from this page.

clipfromhere

She posts that, and then her dumbass leghumper says that this “shows” that I have been on the Shitstead.

God, they are so dumb.

But Nicole then says “Aha! I know how she knows.”

thisishow

And here’s her screen shot from that little conclusion-leaping exercise.

drones

I said that the only enclosures I had ever seen were an unfinished chicken coop and a dog tether.

Uncompleted Chicken Coop

chickencoop

For the dumbass leghumpers, this is a screenshot from Nicole’s video that she posted on her Facebook page months ago.  It is a tour of the unfinished chicken coop/shed.

Dog Tether

dogchained

 

This is just one photo, made and posted by Nicole herself, complete with the Blessed Little Watermark, showing clearly the dog tethered.

Then I speculated that perhaps they added an actual enclosure (run) for the horse.  You know, after the Great Horse Breakout that occurred a while ago.

What I have no knowledge of at all is anything about drones or filming or documentaries. I have no contact whatever with the person/people doing all that. I don’t know if it’s just bullshit or if there is some reality to it.  Hey, Nicole, ever seen any of these drones?  I wouldn’t have any way to know about that since I live miles and miles away from the area.

criminaltrespass

But then we get this brilliant comment.  It’s a cut and paste, of course.  If you take her phrase (the part in quotes) and toss it into Google, it comes up a lot.  Here’s one site.

But I guess Jennifer didn’t bother to read it all.  In addition to the clipped part she reproduces without attribution, in the same paragraph, there’s this.

Laws vary by state, so local laws must be consulted to determine applicable requirements. It is a defense to the crime to show that an element of the crime, such as knowingly entering or remaining without authorization, is lacking. An attempted criminal trespass requires that a defendant act with the intent to commit criminal trespass, and his conduct must constitute a substantial step toward committing the aggravated criminal trespass.

Oh.  That sort  of changes things, doesn’t it?  The supposed criminal has to “act with the intent to commit criminal trespass.”  His conduct has to indicate that he’s trying to trespass without regard for the desire of the property owner.

This means that if some hunter, for example, just wanders onto the Naugler cesspool and has no idea where the boundary lines are (you know, the way the Naugler children have done repeatedly), they can’t just shoot the guy.  They can’t even report him to the police for “criminal trespass.”  He has to do something, and the something can’t just be “taking photos” or “looking around.”

In the case of somebody wandering onto their oh-so-precious Shithole, they would be entitled, certainly, to confront the person and ask what he’s doing there, but that’s all.  No guns blazing. No threats.

. . . they have the backing of local law enforcement.

Think about that a minute. Nicole tries so hard to say that Al and Lisa and I and whoever else have some special relationship with Sheriff Pate. I don’t know Sheriff Pate, have never met him or spoken with him, and I strongly suspect he’d say “Who?” if you mentioned my name to him.

But when Nicole called the police the night of the Blessed Little Excursion, she was infuriated because they didn’t come.  They didn’t come because there was no law broken. You cannot call the police and complain that somebody rode down a public road and you don’t like it.  Well, actually,  you can call.  Nicole did.  But nobody will respond. They will just laugh at you.

physicalnotdeadly

“Charles” finds it funny.  Really?

shoottokillI don’t find this one bit funny.  I consider it a serious threat.

How dare she call you an idiot?

Because she is an idiot.

 

 

 

A Little Announcement

Blogs get a lot of spam. You guys don’t see it, but I do.  For example, right now, the spam folder here has 127 messages in it, and I typically empty it every couple of days.

To make things easier, I have some software on this blog that filters out spam and sends it straight to the spam folder where I can deal with it in bulk.  It’s simply a time-saver and generally works very well.

The last few days, though, something weird has been happening.

Some of your comments are being sent, not to the spam folder, but to the trash.

The bad news is that they were piling up there.  Another bit of bad news is that sometimes the software stuttered and repeated a message several times. And another piece of bad news is that I do not know how to fix it because I do not know what is causing it.

The good news is that now I know this is happening.

I have restored as many as I could, and I will monitor the trash daily from now on.

I am not trying to prevent anyone from posting.  Promise.  🙂

Threats

nicolethreats

We’re supposed to consider ourselves warned.  No matter that not one single critic I know has ever set foot on Naugler property. Not one. Nobody.

Riding down the road is not trespassing, no matter how much Nicole insists it is.

But I want to talk a bit about the threat Nicole is making here.

We will protect our life and property from anyone trespassing.

She is referring to shooting people.  She wants to “be very clear,” so let’s interpret this threat for exactly what it is. She is threatening to shoot anyone who dares put their big toe on her precious cesspool of a property.

No matter that her children have trespassed on all the neighbors’ land repeatedly. Nobody threatened to shoot her fucking children, yet here she is with the threats.  No matter that the Naugler horse was out running around all over the place in the last few weeks.  Nobody shot the damned horse.

But she’ll shoot anyone she sees as a “trespasser.”

And she links to what she thinks is relevant law.

lawkentucky

Note what this is talking about.  Read it carefully.  You too, Nicole, you idiot. Read it.

The “trespasser” has to be in the act of robbing you, or setting fire to your garden sheds.  You can’t just shoot somebody who wanders onto your land.  You can’t shoot somebody who happens to walk across your land, unless they are doing so to rob you or set fire to your “house.”

You can threaten all you like, and you can tag the sheriff if you wish, but if you act on these threats, you will very likely find yourself wearing prison garb for a very long time.

Don’t pay the slightest attention to that imbecile “Charles Smyth,” whoever s/he happened to be today.

shoottokill

What s/he is suggesting is illegal. The Nauglers need to shut up with these kinds of threats.

She’s basing all this on a claim she made today.

tampering

What’s interesting about this is that the tampering claim was made on the Blessed Little Homestead page, where she was sure to get lots of sympathy and pretty much ludicrous advice (electric fencing, anyone, for the off-grid “homesteaders”?)  But she made the Great Threat on her other page where many of the leghumpers won’t see it.  Why is that?

She doesn’t offer the “proof” she says she has, and I frankly don’t give a damn.  Hell, as I mentioned in a comment, I cannot imagine what “animal enclosures” she is talking about.  I’ve seen nothing that could be construed as an “animal enclosure” except an uncompleted chicken coop and some wire strung to run a dog.  Maybe they added an “enclosure” for the horse.

But the bottom line is this.

Nicole, you need to stop threatening to shoot people.  Nobody is doing anything to harm your family.  We’re criticizing you and Joe because you are jackasses. That’s all. Nothing more.

Tone it down. Remember, you do all the “documenting” you like, but so am I.  Every time you say some stupid thing like this, I am going to make sure it ends up right here forever.

 

Cheesy

blhoriginalpost

Boy, what a repository of bullshit this is.  There’s too much here for one post, but that’s okay. We’ll take it in bits and pieces.

I am a farmer and it is sugested [sic]. . .

When you read “it is suggested” you should get out your red flags and start waving them around.  It is suggested by whom?  Leah is a “farmer” of what?

It is “suggested” that GMOs cause allergies by people who don’t like GMOs.

I got sucked into the whole “oh, my God, the sky is falling; GMOs will kill us all” thing a number of years ago. I didn’t really find out anything. I just believed the stuff I read and decided it wasn’t “natural,” and therefore it had to be bad.

I had gardened off and on for decades and knew the value of organic matter in soil, and had always tried to use as many “organic” methods as possible mostly because I’m cheap, but also because I thought that was better for Planet Earth.

And then we moved to Kentucky, eight and a half years ago, and I embarked on a journey that would change my mind entirely.

corn

The first thing I noticed were all the soybean and corn fields. There are two of them right up the road from our house.  They alternate growing each crop annually. And they are Roundup Ready.  Drive down the road in the other direction from my house and you’ll see more corn and soy, also Roundup Ready.

It seemed that all my neighbors were crazy people.

I decided to ask them about it.

The thing you don’t do when you move into an area from someplace else is run around telling all the locals how it is supposed to be done. Instead, you put on your humble cap and sincerely ask. That’s what I did.  I didn’t understand it and I asked, “Why do you grow Roundup Ready seed?”

And they told me.

They said that they do it because it’s better for their bottom line, for their farms, and for their soil.  Yes, the seed costs more, but the benefits far outweigh the added cost of the seed.  They use much less diesel fuel, spend way less time in the field cultivating, and their fields experience much less erosion.

In other words, the evil Monsanto is not bankrupting people. They are, in fact, saving farmers money.

cornkernels

But what about saving seed? They can’t save the seed. Isn’t that horrible?

Well, no, it’s not.  Saving seed isn’t as easy or convenient as many people think.  You don’t just run out to the field and grab a few earns of corn that happen to be at the exact stage that is optimal for storing as seed and there you are.  Well, actually, you could do that but it’s not a good idea.

That’s because to do it right, you would need to take an ear from a plant here and a plant there, all over the field, shell all of them, mix them together, and that would be your “saved seed” for next year.  That would give you maximum genetic diversity.  Take one ear and save it and plant it and it’s sort of like incest (I’m greatly simplifying this, I know, but I don’t want this post to be a book), with less genetic diversity than is desirable.

The seed has be at the exact right stage to make sure it germinates the following year. It has to be stored under the right conditions. You can’t just shuck the ears into a white bucket and stick it in the basement.

In addition, much of the seed used for modern agriculture is hybrid. You can’t save hybrid seeds and have them produce reliably.

In short, saving seed, even from something easy like corn and soy, is kind of labor-intensive.

The way it’s done commercially is that entire fields are grown specifically for seed. They are harvested at the right moment, cleaned the proper way, stored perfectly and then sold to the farmers.  And the vast majority of farmers know this and quit trying to save seed eons ago, long before there was ever GMO anything.  It’s cheaper to let the seedsman do it in bulk.

And that leads me to cheese.  Sort of. I know it doesn’t seem like a reasonable place to go, but just go with me here.

peachescheese2

Like this cheese, in the photo I shared the other day.  My cheese.

potofmilk

I start with a pot full of milk. This is my largest stock pot, which I use almost exclusively for cheese. It holds five gallons of milk.

I bring it slowly to a warm temperature, about 90 to 100 degrees F.

rennet

At that point I add the rennet. That’s the white powder in the little bag.  See those measuring spoons? They aren’t the standard type. They measure 1/8 tsp, 1/16 tsp and 1/32 tsp.  My five gallons of milk requires 1/16 tsp of rennet.

That’s not very much. See the measuring cup?  It has warm water in it, and in the bottom is the 1/16 tsp of rennet. I stir that until it dissolves and then stir that water/rennet solution into the milk.  I have to really stir it for quite a while (two or three minutes by the clock) to make sure it’s distributed well.

Then I cover the pot and leave it undisturbed for about 45 minutes.

When I come back, this is what I find.

milkafterrennet

It might look the same, but it’s not. The paddle is literally cutting the milk.  It coagulates into a mass, sort of like jello.

I cut it into squares with a long bread knife. As I do, a clear liquid starts to seep from the cut squares. The clear liquid is whey.

curds

The squares are called curds.

This is how all cheese is made. The only difference between one type of cheese (cheddar) and another (Parmesan) is in how long the curds and whey are kept at a particular temperature and how rapidly they are heated.

At this point, for my cheese, I start slowly heating the curds, and as I do, the curds become smaller and firmer and there is more and more whey.

When the curds get “done,” that is, they become a little squeaky and almost chewy, I drain the whey (the pig loves it) and salt the curds and they go into a mold and a cheese press.

cheesepress

Here’s mine. The weight on the end is an eight-pound weight, but that translates, because of leverage, to about 60 pounds. The red weight is only three pounds, and it is the one I use first, gradually increasing the pressure for about two hours.  Once it gets to the max, it stays there overnight. Whey is expressed further from the pressure.

The result is a wheel of cheese that weighs about five pounds.  One gallon of milk makes one pound of cheese.

The resultant wheel goes down to the basement to cure. The longer it cures, the sharper it gets.

But what I want to talk about here is rennet.

Remember the calves and their little pens that we built so they won’t die?

Calves are born with only one part of their stomach active. That part, the abomasum, secretes rennet.  When a calf drinks milk, it goes straight to the abomasum, bypassing all the other parts of the ruminant stomach.  Immediately rennet is secreted, curds form, and the resultant curds sit in the abomasum for a longer period of time than just plain milk would, and that’s how a calf digests milk.

If the calf overfeeds, the abomasum gets too full, and plain milk, not whey, gets pushed along into the intestinal tract, and plain milk is like a gourmet feast for bacteria.  The calf gets diarrhea, the bacteria get all out of balance and the calf can become very, very ill in a very short time. This is called “milk scours,” and I hate it.  Calves beg for seconds on their bottles. They act like they are dying of starvation. They are not, and giving them extra is cruel. It can kill them.

When a calf is about a month old, sometimes a bit sooner, sometimes a little later, he will start to nibble grain and hay. As he does so, the other parts of his stomach that digest those things begin to “wake up” and become functional. And the amount of rennet secreted begins to subside.  We bottle-feed our little guys until they are eating hay and grain well, and show no signs of scouring at all. This is generally at least eight weeks and sometimes as long as twelve.  Plenty of farmers wean them much sooner, but we are softies.

But back in the bad old days, there was only way to get rennet to make cheese.

rhonda

You had to take a young calf that had never eaten anything but milk and kill it and then harvest the abomasum and dry it and powder it.

Imagine Kraft cheese.  Think about all those calves.

As the demand for cheese increased in the USA, back when I was a child, people became a bit squeamish about killing all those calves for rennet.   The result was an uneven supply of rennet and resultant higher prices for cheese.

So food scientists began looking for another way.  They looked at vegetable sources for rennet. They found some. Vegetable rennet is available today, and you can find cheese in some health-stores made with vegetable rennet.  I will tell you right now it sucks.  It simply doesn’t do as good a job as the substance that evolved in cattle to make curds.

The scientists knew it sucked too, so they looked a bit more.

And in the late eighties, they figured out a way.

Wanna guess?  Got any idea?

They genetically modified bacteria with genes from calves to produce rennet.  They tested the hell out of it.  And in 1990, this genetically modified rennet was approved and has been used to make cheese in the United States ever since.  The vast majority of cheese made here is made with GMO rennet and has been for nearly 27 years.

dinnerslopcheese

You know, cheese.  Like this.

Funny how you never hear anything about this.  Nobody gripes or protests or marches against cheese. Nobody says, “Oh, gee, I have all these allergies, and I’m sure it’s because there are GMOs in cheese.”

But all those calves got to live.

Now, if I have piqued your interest in this subject because I am saying things you never heard before, you might find this interesting. This video gave me a whole lot to think about.

Dave and I had a lot of conversations about it. We did a great deal of reading. And then we went to the store and bought some Roundup.  Sure makes fences easier to maintain.

 

 

 

Wendy

Here’s how this works.  I have this blog. I also have a Facebook page. It is pretty much public. Pretty much anyone can comment there.

At their own risk.

I usually post a link on there to this blog when I post a new article.  Wendy thought it would be a great idea to come over to my Facebook page and confront me.  Not here.  There.  And then she got her feelings hurt and deleted it all.

She can do that on Facebook, which of course, deleted not just her comment but all the stuff written in reply to her.  Poof.  Gone.

Well, not exactly. . .

originalcomment

comments2

comments3

Nobody has to agree with me.  People here disagree with me quite often. Kaylee and I go at it pretty fiercely from time to time.  (Don’t we, Kaylee? )

But I get sort of irritated with people who dive in, make nasty little comments about “God” and inaccurate statements about what I said here  on this blog and then try to disappear.

 

Reading and Children

blhbullshit

First, nobody “attacked” the child.  Nobody “mocked” the child.  Nobody “mocked” the content of the books.  They are perfectly fine books—for a three-year-old.

We attacked you, Nicole.  We mock you.  You and Joe are abysmally awful parents.

But I want to play your other game.  Reading and children. That’s the subject, is it?

You quote some stats. You don’t link to any of them, so they are relatively difficult to ferret out.

However, you make some really contradictory statements in there.  First, you insist that reading scores are dropping.  Then, at the end of the next paragraph, you say that “stats haven’t changed much in the past decade.”

Which is it?  Are they dropping?  Or are they staying the same?

Well, the fact is that they are staying the same.  Or at least, that’s how it appears.  There doesn’t appear to be data to tell us what has been going on in the past decade or so, but for the decade prior to that, it held steady.

Now maybe you have data I don’t, Nicole, but you didn’t cite it. You just asserted shit without bothering to tell us where you got it beyond saying “according to the NEAP.”  I don’t care to spend my entire afternoon searching through that website to find that wee bit of info, so I will sort of ignore it.  I suspect you didn’t either.

I suspect you visited some pro-homeschooling (or more likely, pro-unschooling) site and just did a bit of copy and paste.

However, if you look at the stats, they are instructive.

For instance, you blithely quote:

Only 25% of college graduates are deemed proficient.

And then you start the hand-wringing.

But what does that mean, actually?  What is “proficient” when it comes to this data?

proficient
click image to link to source

It means really, really good at it. So that 25% figure is not what Nicole thinks it is.  She’s implying that 75% of college graduates are functionally illiterate and that is simply not the case at all.

I knew when I read what she wrote that she was totally misinterpreting the data terribly.  It’s impossible for 75% of college graduates to be unable to read adequately, especially in light of this.

earnings
click image to link to source

If 75% of college graduates couldn’t even read, why would they consistently make more money and be more employable than those who hadn’t attained those levels of education?  Why would an employer pay somebody that much more money if they couldn’t function on the job?

If 75% of college graduates couldn’t read, they also wouldn’t have been able to learn any history or much math or much of anything else. They wouldn’t be any more educated than a high school dropout. Yet they consistently earn more than twice as much.

Either employers across America are colossal dumbasses or something is wrong with Nicole’s assumption.

In addition, about 10% of college students in the US come from other countries. Now, either they are extremely stupid and come here to spend lots of money for a very sub-par education where they might not even be able to read when they get done, or something is wrong with Nicole’s assumption.

That’s why I knew that “proficient” didn’t mean what she thought it meant.

That does not mean that “proficient” means the exact same thing regardless of the testing or data you are looking at.  But it does mean that college graduates pretty much know how to read.

She laments:

. . . reading levels aren’t improving and children and even adults aren’t reading for pleasure.

I dunno about that.  I mean, I am not disputing the whole “people don’t read for pleasure” thing, except I would suggest that you need to define “read for pleasure” more specifically.

I am a reader.  A really big reader. I have been ever since the day I was taught how to sound out vowels.  I am a college graduate. I read for pleasure. I enjoy fiction, non-fiction, the phone book, recipe books, I don’t care. I read.

My husband is also a college graduate. He does not read books. We’ve been married for 46 years. I do not remember him ever reading an entire book for pleasure in that whole time.  He reads parts of books.  He looks up stuff. He’s completely literate. He graduated with honors. He reads to keep up with the news. He just can’t bear reading fiction.

“Reading for pleasure” is a great thing. I don’t know how people like Dave survive without doing so.  I just know that they can and do and they are often completely and totally literate.

One thing (reading for pleasure) does not equal the other thing (literacy).

proficient2
click image to link to source

Here’s some newer figures from the ebil gubmint.  In this case, what is “proficient”?  Does this mean that only about a third of grade-school students can read or do math?

proficientdefinition

There’s the definition. You decide what that means.

And remember, factored into all this are all the students, not just a select group. So special-needs students count, those who are struggling, and they skew the percentages down.  You’re never going to see percentages in the 90’s or even in the eighties no matter what.

belowbasic

Just as an aside, if you find this stuff interesting, take a look at the page I’ve snipped from and scroll through it.

Then come back and try to tell me education doesn’t matter.

So the argument for stricter homeschool laws completely missed the bigger picture.

And there comes the Great Leap.

Nicole’s assertion seems to be that since most college graduates are illiterate, unschooling is therefore marvelous.

This is ridiculous, of course.

Here are the US rates of illiteracy.

usstats
click image to link to source

Note that, 14%.  This is with 91% of our population completing high school.

But here are countries that rely heavily on “unschooling.”

illiteracyrateforeign

Going to school in one of those countries is tough. Most people can’t.  In many of them, women don’t go ever, period.

But Nicole has told us, time and again, that kids will just learn to read all by themselves. They don’t need any damn teachers.  They just learn.

Why don’t they learn in Afghanistan?  Why don’t they learn in Chad?

And if they just learn all by themselves, why is she even having the conversation at all?  What’s the point?  Just leave the kids alone, like she does, and they too will be reading books intended for three-year-olds when they are nearly ten.

 

 

 

Reading

mommybooks

The child who bought these books is almost ten years old. In the real world, she’d be in the 3rd grade.

These books are suitable for pre-schoolers. They aren’t “books” in the sense that the child is expected to read them. They are “picture books.” They are intended for non-readers, for parents to read to their kids before bedtime.

When I first saw this, I wanted to give Nicole the benefit of the doubt. Maybe the kid bought the books for her younger siblings.

But then, Nicole says, that we should notice the theme. In other words, the child bought the books because this is what interests her. Being a mommy interests her. We’re supposed to think that is adorable. It makes me want to cry.  But she’s telling me that the child bought the books, using her own money that she earns making bows and washing dogs for almost nothing, because that is what she can read.

I get the idea that often, for entertainment, children will read below their grade level. I raised a son. He did that sometimes. And sometimes he read books that were actually far above his grade level, especially if they contained information he wanted to know about.

But this is not even close to that.

Here’s a sample from the book on the bottom right, Little Mommy.

littlemommy

The whole book is like this. Two rhyming, very simple sentences maximum per page. Some pages only have one line.

It’s a picture book. You read it to your 3-year-old.

It’s also sort of interesting because the child in the book uses a washing machine and has a kitchen and lives in a real house, but that’s another story.

What does the average ten-year-old read?  Not an exceptional, greatly advanced ten-year-old, but just an average one.

minnacover
click image to link to source

Here’s a sample.  This comes from a reading list for third graders.

minnasample

It doesn’t take a genius to see the difference.

No pictures. Lots of words on the page.  Bigger words, like “telephone” and “forsythia.” Numerous metaphors. The number “fourteen.” Greatly descriptive, almost poetic sentences.

Nicole and Joe Naugler are not educating their children. I know it. They know it. The whole world knows it. CPS knows it.  They are simply not educating those kids.

In my view, this is the most egregious thing they have done. Isolating them is bad. Neglecting them is bad. Living in a damned garden shed is horrible. Blaming them for not being able to run a fucking “homestead” is terrible.

But not educating them should be a criminal offense. The fact that the state of Kentucky allows them to get away with this infuriates me.

UPDATE:

I have been corrected by several folks, some of whom also have the child’s date of birth, and it seems she would be in 4th grade.  (It’s been a long time since I dealt with school children.)

This, of course, only makes it worse.

Here’s a sample book from that grade level.

cricketcover
click image to link to source

cricketsample

 

Real Food

vitamins

I hate vitamin supplements.

Well, I don’t hate them, but the evidence indicates that they are not necessary for most people in first world countries under most circumstances.

We used them in a hospital setting, but that was with people who were already ill.

There are diseases that can cause vitamin deficiencies. My mother is a good example. She is a celiac.  Not the fake “I’m gluten-sensitive” currently popular type, but the real deal. She was celiac long before being gluten-intolerant was cool.  In addition, she contracted non-tropical sprue (an intestinal disorder) just after World War II when she was en route to the United States on a bride ship from Australia.

The doctors had no idea what was wrong with her. They didn’t know about either condition. One specialist told her she probably had leukemia.

At any rate, as a result, she became very deficient in Vitamin B-12 and had to take shots. I remember her doing this when I was a child.  She gave them to herself which always fascinated me.

When I went to nursing school, I bullied her until she went to see an internist I knew and he diagnosed her as celiac just from a  brief conversation (later confirmed with actual tests).  Her gut began to heal and she no longer needs the vitamin shots.

So that’s an example of a necessary use of vitamin supplementation.  Pregnancy is another. (Folic acid tablets are simply too easy and cheap to risk spina bifida by not doing it.) But most people don’t need them. As one of my doctor friends used to say, all people are doing is creating very expensive urine. That is because the usual first-world diet has all the vitamins and minerals any human being needs.

So here I agree with Nicole.

I will pause for a moment while you pick your jaw up off the floor.

Eat real food.

But then she just drives right off the cliff.

“Real food.”

There are two big problems with her statement.

First Problem:  Nicole is the biggest hypocrite on the planet.

chocolatecake

Chocolate cake for breakfast.  It’s obvious that 13 people didn’t have chocolate cake for breakfast unless she bought six of these, so one assumes that Nicole bought it and hoarded it for herself, but still, she had cake for breakfast and dares anyone to criticize her.

For the record, as you’ll see, I’m not critical of her choice. I’m critical of her bullshit hypocrisy.

hardees

See? They’re at Hardee’s, having “real food.”

hardees2

They go there a lot, as you can see.

gyro

She’s gonna go get her a nice gyro.  “Real food” from the takeout place.

icecream

Here’s some “real food.”  How much do you bet she bought this someplace?  We have ice cream here too.  Sometimes we buy it, but often we make it from our cow’s cream.

nachos

And she starts them young with that “real food.”  Super nachos from Hardee’s.

softdrinks

Just so you know, Alex Jones is a blithering idiot and ninety percent of the stuff from his site is total bullshit.  “Chemicals” in soft drinks are fine. They are not “habit forming” or “addictive.”  The problem with too many soft drinks is too much sugar.

drpepper

If that is the case, why in the world do you post shit like this, Nicole?

starterkit

It’s quite true that nicotine and caffeine and alcohol are all mind-altering drugs.  (I’m not sure why the Mars bar is there, except for the idea that somehow sugar is bad, which it is not – unless they are representing chocolate, and Nytol and Ritalin aren’t pretending to be anything at all other than drugs, one by prescription and the other over the counter).

I don’t consume caffeine in very large quantities because I have a problem with rebound headaches if I do.  It’s present in chocolate, but in small quantities. And alcohol, while it is a drug, is nice in small amounts and I partake from time to time, but have rarely been drunk.

However, there is no evidence, zilch, nada, that would suggest that if you use alcohol or caffeine or nicotine, you are somehow going to progress to other drugs.  None of those substances could remotely be considered a “starter kit.”  This is nonsense.

And that leads me to the second point.

Second Problem:  What in the hell is “real food”?

Nicole loves to talk about this. She likes it because it’s all healthy and homesteady and it makes her sound like Earth Mother.  Everyone nods sagely and agrees.  “Just eat real food.”

When people say this, I tend to exit the conversation because what is going to follow is complete bullshit.

What most people mean when they say “eat real food” is “don’t eat processed foods.”

But that leads directly to another question.  What are “processed foods”?

If you look up the definition of the term, you’ll find stuff all over the map.

processedfooddefinition

So from this definition, which is not really very accurate (more in a moment about that), we get two main things: packaged in something, and contains the dreaded chemicals.

Exactly how are you supposed to get your food home from the store if it’s not packaged in something?  Even if you buy fresh produce, they put it in a bag.

Chemicals.  Sigh.  Everyone has spasms about chemicals. Salt is a chemical, folks.  Sugar is a chemical compound.  You are a bunch of chemicals.

Some artificially produced chemicals are very dangerous indeed.  For example:  ethylene glycol. That’s the stuff in anti-freeze. Don’t let your pets near it.  Some artificially produced chemicals are preferable to their “natural” counterparts:  melatonin, for example (“natural” melatonin can be toxic, artificial melatonin is much safer, if you’re going to take that shit, which I do not.)

Chemical is not a dirty word.

processedfooddefinition2
click image for link to source

So here’s a better definition of the term.  “Processing” is whatever you do to food before you eat it.

cannedpeaches

Here’s some peaches being processed, put in cans so people can store them on the shelf for a considerable length of time.

cheese

And here’s some serious food processing:  cheese. The factory takes milk and adds some chemicals (rennet, which by the way is almost entirely GMO in America and has been for decades, and salt), heats it slowly and then presses the hell out of the curd that results.

These are processed foods.

peachescheese2

So are these.

The difference is that the last picture was taken by me in my kitchen of my canned peaches and my cheese.

There is virtually no difference nutritionally in my processed food and the photos of the factories above.  None.

If you take a tomato and slice it, you have processed it.  Here I am, processing some meat.

butcheringmeat

But, you say, that’s not what people mean when they talk about “processed food.”

I know.

They mean this.

junkfood

I blew that photo up and tried to identify some of the foods that are in it, and was surprised to see Jif. It made me laugh.

Peanut butter is the food that held me together when I was a kid. I love the stuff.  I still eat it often.  And I have eaten every kind of peanut butter there is, creamy, crunchy, “natural,” “processed,” homemade from peanuts that we grew ourselves.  All of it.  I love it no matter what, but I greatly prefer the processed stuff because it spreads better.

They also have Kraft Singles in there. You know, cheese.

Oh, and Wonder Bread, as though that is really bad.

bread

Here’s a loaf of my bread. To make it, I begin by grinding whole wheat berries into flour. That’s called “processing,” by the way.  When I mix up the loaf, I put chemicals in it.  I add salt, gluten flour, and something called “dough conditioner.”

doughconditioner

That’s what is in it.  I use very little (that 3 tsp serving size is for a whole loaf of bread).  It makes all the difference in how the bread slices and stores and everything. I’ve been using it for years, and so do the Wonder Bread people, and so does every other bakery in America.

The truth is that there is very, very little difference between my bread and Wonder Bread when it comes to nutrition.  I prefer mine for two reasons: it’s cheaper and it tastes better.  But if I’m in the middle of house-remodeling like I am right now, and my kitchen is torn all to hell, I have no qualms at all about buying a loaf or two of bread from the store. We grumble a little but it’s fine.

The truth is that America’s food is some of the best in the world.  The quality is high.

We shop largely at Aldi. It’s cheap and so are we, so it’s a good fit for us. One major reason that Aldi is cheap is that there are few choices.  If you go in there and want a bottle of ketchup, you will find one size, one brand. Take it or leave it.

Do you want eggs? Aldi has eggs.  One size, one kind. That’s it.

The other day, I had to shop at Kroger for the first time in about three years (other than running in there for an occasional item that Aldi doesn’t carry).  I found that experience to be a little unsettling.

I needed those two things, among others:  ketchup and eggs.  There were so many choices I had difficulty.  I just wanted plain-Jane ordinary ketchup, but I was faced with 15 different kinds and brands. I wanted a dozen eggs, but there were ten different brands and kinds. I nearly had a meltdown right there in the store.  And that was a small Kroger. They’ve put in a very large one in a neighboring town and I’ll be damned if I will ever put my foot in it.

My point though is that we have a lot of food available and there is nothing wrong with any of it.

Take that photo of the Naugler baby and the nachos.

There is nothing wrong with nachos, even from Hardee’s.  Corn chips, and cheese, and probably salsa and maybe some sour cream.

Our problem is that we have so much food that we eat too much of it, and I am guilty of that.

But, you say, we need to eat more food as it comes from nature.  Why? What is the difference between my canned peaches (or the commercial canned peaches) and a peach?  The answer is pretty much nothing.

Where we screw up is that instead of those canned peaches, which are identical nutritionally to a fresh peach, we eat peach ice cream or peach cobbler.

And that leads me to sugar.

It gets a bad rap. People carry on like it’s tantamount to eating arsenic.  It’s not. Sugar is good stuff.

And there is virtually no difference at all between ordinary white sugar and honey or molasses or any other sweetener (artificial ones excepted). All of them are sweeteners, and all of them provide basically “empty” calories. And none of us need to eat mountains of any of them.  Honey is not “better” for you than sugar.

But I think most parents already know this basic stuff.

But what about this?

chili

Nicole posts these types of photos and I see people go off on her for it.

This particular “chili” is fine as far as I can tell.  I’m not sure we’d eat it because I don’t think Dave would like it.  It’s not how I make chili.  But that’s okay.  There is nothing at all wrong with any ingredient in it.

But it’s not what is conventionally called “real food.”  It’s mostly processed foods from cans all dumped together in a pot.

godawfulrice

And there is this.  Nicole admits this is bad, and I agree with her.  It’s not that it’s bad food – it’s not – but holy shit, how do you screw up something that horribly?  It looks like she dumped some raw rice and water along with a package or two of frozen mixed veggies in a crock pot and thought magic would happen.

joechili

First, would somebody please steal that bowl from these folks and destroy it?  It looks like the inside of one of the plastic buckets they use for. . . well, you know. . .

Second, what in the hell is that?

Beans and rice or beans and noodles are good foods. You don’t need meat with every meal, even if you’re a growing child. Beans are a great food and Americans should eat more of them.

But damn, what is that?

Seriously, if Nicole can’t come up with better stuff than this, she needs to quit lecturing us about “real food.”

broccolitomatoes

Here’s an example of what is so disingenuous about her.  She says that she has “eliminated. . . most processed food.”

No, she hasn’t. Not even close.  Not even slightly.  In fact, she eats as much processed food as anyone. Do  you think nobody else has ever eaten cherry tomatoes before?  Or raw broccoli in a salad?

hamburgers

Note the photo of the “real food” for dinner.  Hamburgers on white bread (store bought), sliced tomato, fried potatoes.

There is nothing at all different about that than this.

bigmacfries

Please understand that I am not saying that Nicole’s food choices are bad.  I have never said that. I know people do say that, but I’m not one of them. There’s nothing at all wrong with having a hamburger with some fried potatoes and sliced tomatoes.

I don’t find fault with her menu postings (she did some on one of her blogs and people had conniptions because of their supposed inferior nutritional content.) I sometimes make menus like that and just because I write down “Tuesday: spaghetti” that doesn’t mean that spaghetti is the only thing that will be offered.  There will probably be a salad and bread and maybe some fruit for dessert.

What I am criticizing is her attempt to appear all “natural” and homesteady while the reality is that she eats just like the rest of us, only she appears to be able to consume Joe’s can-dumping “chili” and I know I couldn’t do it. I am criticizing her little memes saying that we don’t need vitamins because we should just eat “real food,” when she doesn’t eat any different from anyone else.  I am criticizing her claims that they have “eliminated processed foods” when they absolutely have not done that at all.

She’s fake.  You know, fake, like store-brand cola instead of the Real Thing.

 

 

 

 

Yes, She Did

neverleftproperty

You know, I tried to be really nice about this, in part because the whole thing involves a young girl who will get the blame if something really negative happens, but Nicole has to be an ass.  She apparently cannot help it.

Believe me, or don’t believe me. I don’t really care. But there are some things that I just know, and this is one of them.  The Naugler horse was loose. The Naugler horse was running around all over the place, on at least two of the neighboring properties, having a super-good time.

I saw the video.

The reason that Nicole Naugler will never see the video is because she would spend endless amounts of time trying to identify the angle from which the video was shot and thus come up with the supposed identity of the videographer, and she would most likely be very wrong.  She would then accuse that person of “stalking” her.

Let me explain something about loose livestock.  Unless you are physically present when they get loose, like the day that Somebody left our gate open and a couple of calves got out, and you never lose sight of the animal for an instant, you have no idea where they went or where they’ve been and what in the hell they have been doing.

When that bull appeared in my backyard and scared the shit out of me, he bolted and was gone, completely out of sight, in less than 30 seconds. Within a minute, the neighbors were out hunting for him.  And they didn’t find him for two weeks.

Nobody knows where he was all that time or what he was doing.

And Nicole Naugler doesn’t have the slightest idea where their horse went while she was loose.  Unless she went home and tied herself back up, somebody in that family knows that the horse was loose.  Hell, I don’t know everywhere the horse went. I just know with absolute certainty that the horse was not on their property and was running about on two of their neighbors’ properties.

There are only two possibilities here.  Either Nicole is flat-out lying, or somebody lied to Nicole about this.

I don’t actually know why she has chosen to dig in on this one, frankly.  Like the beer-drinking in the road that night that she insisted didn’t happen, she is denying reality. There is nothing wrong with having your animal get loose.  Nobody is going to call some authority and complain unless it were to happen every single day.  It was just sort of funny, like the times our donkeys went walkabout.

And one other thing:  If the horse “has never left the property,” why do they have it?  I know they carry on about their “28 acres” as though that is a massive amount of land, but it’s not.  There isn’t a whole lot of space to ride there. Much of it is wooded. The short dirt “roads” on the Blessed Shithole aren’t much distance for riding. It would be pretty hard to even get up to a canter in that little bit of space.

Yet the road is dirt.  Perfect riding.  Why aren’t they taking the horse up and down the road?

Running Horse

There’s a picture of a horse that’s running
Hanging here right before my eyes
Always there to remind me
Of the best of old times

Running Horse, Poco

The Naugler’s horse got loose.

It was inevitable that the horse would get loose. She seemed to be enjoying herself immensely, running around the neighborhood happily.

I have a bit of sympathy with people whose animals get loose. We have two donkeys.

georgiacheney

Here they are. On the left is Georgia.  On the right is her mother, Cheney. (Cheney is much smaller and fatter than her daughter.)

They look so sweet, don’t they?

Do not be fooled. They are holy terrors. They are escape artists.  They love to get out and go walkabout.

The neighbor has mules. Georgia and Cheney like to go visit them, and pretend to be big.  They look ridiculous but they don’t know it.

The first time they got out (several years ago), Dave was out-of-state and my neighbor came over to tell me that they were out.  He helped me round them up and run them into another neighbor’s paddock.  I couldn’t bring them home because even though they wear halters, they do not lead.

Later that evening, the neighbor tied them behind his four-wheeler and dragged their sorry asses home.

oldfenceelectric

This is the fencing that was present when we bought this place. I think this photo was made during the fencing renovation and it looks like a couple of the strands of wire have been removed, but originally there were four strands of high tensile electric wire.  High tensile wire is strong and when it is spooled up, it’s very heavy.

It’s supposed to be great stuff.

I hate it.

I don’t like fiddling with the electric. I don’t like turning it off and then forgetting to turn it back on.  I just despise it.

After the donkeys managed the Great Escape a couple of times, we did this.

newfence

See the wooded area beyond the fenceline?  That’s the back of our property.  It’s basically a ravine. It covers maybe 2 or perhaps 3 of our acres. It’s useless except that it serves as a buffer between us and the neighbors behind us.

The previous owner here ran cattle in that pasture.  No way is a cow going to go down into that ravine willingly. So he didn’t worry about the fencing back in there. We didn’t realize that.

Donkeys love ravines. They have a grand time in them.  And that is where our donks were getting out. The “fencing” back there wasn’t high tensile wire, four strands, with nice fence poles.  It was some barbed wire strung between trees.  The donkeys saw it and laughed and said, “Let’s go visit the mules.”

We fixed one place. They found another. We gave up, confined them to the paddock (otherwise known as “prison”) and redid the fencing. They haven’t escaped since (three years).

When they got out, we got them back as rapidly as we could. Our neighbors helped.  I was horrified because they managed to get into one neighbor’s newly planted corn (garden, not field).  I tried to get them to let me come over and replant it, or pay them , or something. They laughed and refused, and told me later there was no damage that they could see.

A year or so later, the neighbor with the garden was at our door because he had two beef calves who escaped.  We went with him to help hunt them. I don’t think he ever found them.

And we’ve had our little Jersey bull calves escape a few times, mostly when somebody who shall not be named here left the gate open. Once they tore our garden to shreds before the next-door neighbor drove by, saw them, and put them up.  And once we were eating breakfast and saw them trot past the window.

So we know about having livestock escape. It happens to everyone who has animals. As one neighbor said, “If you haven’t had livestock escape, you haven’t had much livestock.”

About a year ago, I walked outside with Minnie to take her potty and came face-to-face with an Angus bull.  We do not raise Angus bulls. I didn’t know anyone who did.

I was so startled, and the bull seemed so big, that I screamed right in his face. I scared both me and him out of our collective wits.  He ran one way, and I ran the other.

I am used to bull calves. We’ve raised dozens and dozens of them. But little Jersey bull calves are one thing. A big Angus is another.

Anyway, the same neighbor who said that to me about having livestock escape came running up a few minutes later yelling “Where did he go?”  I pointed. And off he went.

It was a bull he had borrowed from a friend for breeding.

He was gone for about two weeks.  They finally found him in a guy’s field with his cows several miles away.  Nobody ever figured out how he got out in the first place, or how he got in with the cows (he obviously jumped both fences), but he was brought home and everything ended well.

However, the saying around the neighborhood now is that if you have an animal you don’t want, just bring to Sally and she will scream at it and you’ll never see it again.

So anyway, when I heard that the Naugler’s horse got loose, I admit that I laughed.  It’s actually a pretty dangerous situation, though.  If the horse gets out in the road and a car hits it, the Nauglers will be liable for the damages to the car.  And like Georgia and Cheney, the runaway donkeys, once they get out, they discover how much fun it is and then you’re in for trouble because they will try again.

There’s a huge difference between allowing your goats to run “free-range” because you think you live in the “wilderness” and it’s all homesteady, and having a horse that you actually are trying to keep contained escape. People tend to get pissed off royally at the first and are usually pretty sympathetic about the second.

That is, they are sympathetic provided you do something to correct the situation. In our case, we tried fixing the fence twice. It simply didn’t work because the terrain was terrible.  So we spent some bucks (quite a few of them) and fenced the property securely.

Sounds like the Naugs need to do a bit of upgrading.